‘Should We Test for THC?’: Changes in Marijuana Drug Testing

As marijuana continues to gain legal acceptance across the United States and around the world, more companies are reconsidering their drug testing policies, particularly when it comes to THC, the primary psychoactive compound in cannabis. This shift has prompted a growing demand for instant drug tests that do not include THC, as well as a reliable THC impairment test (similar to alcohol’s breathalyzer) that can accurately determine if an individual is impaired by marijuana use. By 2024, significant advancements have been made in this field, though challenges still remain.

The Changing Landscape of Drug Testing

Historically, employers have been strict about maintaining a drug-free workplace, and it has always been assumed THC would be included in the standard panel of tested drugs. With marijuana becoming legal for recreational and medicinal use in many states, companies are now grappling with the implications for their drug testing policies.

It’s important to note that state laws regarding marijuana drug testing vary widely. For example, in states like Nevada and New York, employers are prohibited from discriminating against employees based on positive THC tests, provided the use does not affect job performance or occur during working hours. In contrast, other states allow employers to maintain drug-free workplace policies and conduct THC testing, especially in safety-sensitive industries. Therefore, employers must be aware of the specific laws in their state to ensure compliance and avoid legal issues.

Some organizations have chosen to stop testing for THC altogether, primarily due to three factors:

  • The evolving legal landscape surrounding marijuana use
  • The desire to attract a broader talent pool, as eliminating THC testing could expand the number of potential job candidates
  • The recognition that off-duty marijuana use might not necessarily impair an employee’s job performance

Drug Tests Without THC

In response to the changing legal landscape and the growing demand for drug tests that exclude THC, manufacturers have developed urine and saliva instant drug tests with popular configurations that do not test for the psychoactive compound. These tests allow companies to continue monitoring their employees for other substances while respecting their employees’ rights to consume marijuana in accordance with local laws. That said, we still recommend testing for THC when possible and appropriate.

Employers should carefully assess their specific situations and make a determination based on local laws and regulations. In industries where safety is paramount, such as transportation or heavy machinery operation, testing for THC may be essential to maintain a safe work environment. In other cases, employers may choose to exclude THC from testing to accommodate the changing societal norms surrounding marijuana use.

To view our available drug tests that do not include THC, click here – Non-THC Tests.

The Need for a THC Impairment Test

Despite the growing acceptance of marijuana use, employers still have a responsibility to ensure a safe working environment, particularly in roles where impairment could pose significant risks. This has led to an increasing need for an accurate and reliable THC impairment test.

Unlike alcohol, where a breathalyzer can provide a reliable measure of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and help determine impairment, no such equivalent exists for marijuana. THC can be detected in blood, urine, or saliva, but the presence of THC does not directly correlate to impairment, as the substance can remain in the body for an extended period after use.

Several companies and researchers have been working on developing a THC impairment test. While no single test has been universally accepted, some promising advancements have been made:

  • Breath-based THC testing: Several companies have developed breathalyzer-like devices to detect THC in breath samples. These devices aim to measure recent marijuana use, typically within a few hours, which could provide a better indication of impairment than traditional blood, urine, or saliva tests. However, as of 2024, these breath-based THC tests are still being refined to ensure accuracy and reliability.
  • Roadside saliva tests: In some jurisdictions, law enforcement agencies have adopted roadside saliva tests that can detect the presence of THC. However, these tests also face similar challenges in determining impairment, as the presence of THC does not necessarily indicate impairment.
  • Behavioral and cognitive testing: Researchers at companies like DRUID App and Cambridge Cognition are exploring the use of behavioral and cognitive tests to determine marijuana impairment. These tests assess an individual’s ability to perform tasks requiring concentration, attention, and coordination – all of which can be impacted by marijuana use.

Conclusion

As marijuana legalization continues to spread, companies are reassessing their drug testing policies and shifting their focus toward impairment detection. Although advancements have been made in developing a reliable THC impairment test, no single method has been universally accepted. As research and technology continue to evolve, it is likely that a more accurate and reliable test will be developed, allowing for a better understanding of marijuana’s effects on workplace safety and productivity.

Last Updated: 5/28/2024

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Disclaimer: The information presented in this article is intended for informational purposes only. RiskProducts.com is not a law firm, and no attorneys were employed or consulted in the compilation of the information contained herein. It is highly recommended that users consult with an attorney or a drug testing expert before making any policy decisions based, in part or in whole, on the information contained in this article. All forms of diagnostic and employment testing must be conducted in compliance with applicable state and federal laws. Ensuring compliance is the sole responsibility of the user of this information and the entity they represent.

 

 

Outdated Drugs: Reevaluating Your Company’s Substance Abuse Policy

Substance abuse policies are a crucial component of a safe and productive work environment. However, as drug trends change over time, it’s essential for companies to reevaluate their policies to ensure they remain relevant and effective. In this article, we will discuss drugs that were once popular but have become less prevalent in recent years. By understanding the shifting landscape of drug abuse, companies can make informed decisions about which substances to include in their policies.

Phencyclidine (PCP)
PCP, also known as angel dust, was a popular recreational drug in the 1960s and 1970s. Initially developed as an anesthetic, PCP gained popularity for its hallucinogenic and dissociative effects. However, due to its dangerous side effects, including extreme agitation, hallucinations, and violent behavior, PCP use has significantly decreased. While PCP may still be abused in some areas, its overall prevalence has diminished, making it less relevant for inclusion in a company’s substance abuse policy.

Peyote
Peyote is a small cactus that contains mescaline, a powerful hallucinogen. Used for centuries in Native American religious ceremonies, peyote became popular among countercultural groups in the 1960s and 1970s. Today, peyote use is relatively uncommon, and its cultivation and distribution are heavily regulated. As a result, peyote may not warrant inclusion in a modern substance abuse policy.

Quaaludes (Methaqualone)
Quaaludes, a brand name for methaqualone, were widely prescribed as a sedative and sleep aid in the 1960s and 1970s. Due to their euphoric and relaxing effects, Quaaludes became a popular recreational drug. However, the drug was associated with a high risk of overdose and addiction. As a result, Quaaludes were classified as a Schedule I controlled substance in the United States in 1984, and their production was discontinued. While Quaaludes may still be found in some areas, their rarity and limited availability make them a less pressing concern for company substance abuse policies.

Barbiturates (BAR)
Barbiturates, a class of drugs used as sedatives and hypnotics, were widely prescribed for anxiety, insomnia, and seizures in the mid-20th century. Their abuse potential led to a surge in recreational use, often resulting in overdose and death. With the introduction of benzodiazepines, a safer alternative, barbiturate prescriptions declined, and their abuse has become less common. While some barbiturates are still prescribed for specific medical conditions, their reduced prevalence and abuse rates may warrant their exclusion from a company’s substance abuse policy.

Propoxyphene (PPX)
Propoxyphene, an opioid analgesic once commonly prescribed for mild to moderate pain, was removed from the US market in 2010 due to its association with severe cardiac side effects. At the time, propoxyphene was widely abused and was responsible for numerous overdose deaths. With the drug no longer available, its inclusion in a substance abuse policy may be unnecessary.

Conclusion
As the landscape of drug abuse changes over time, companies must regularly reassess their substance abuse policies to ensure their continued effectiveness. It’s essential to err on the side of caution when updating your policy. If you are aware of unusual production and use of a specific drug in your area, even if it’s considered outdated, it may be wise to include it in your policy to address potential risks.

Additionally, companies should be prepared to collaborate with other businesses or clients that may have different substance abuse policies. In these situations, it’s important to remain flexible and adhere to the policy of the partnering company, even if it includes drugs that you may not consider relevant to your own policy.

By staying informed about the prevalence and risks associated with various drugs, employers can create targeted policies that address the most pressing concerns and promote a safe and healthy work environment. Open communication and adaptability in working with other organizations will ensure that your company remains compliant and maintains a strong reputation in your industry.

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Disclaimer: The information presented in this article is intended for informational purposes only. RiskProducts.com is not a law firm, and no attorneys were employed or consulted in the compilation of the information contained herein. It is highly recommended that users consult with an attorney or a drug testing expert before making any policy decisions based, in part or in whole, on the information contained in this article. All forms of diagnostic and employment testing must be conducted in compliance with applicable state and federal laws. Ensuring compliance is the sole responsibility of the user of this information and the entity they represent.

Top 5: Warehouse & Office Accident/Injuries

The top 5 types of accidents in a WAREHOUSE/LIGHT INDUSTRIAL environment:

  1. Slips, trips, and falls: These accidents are common in warehouses and light industrial environments due to various factors such as wet or slippery surfaces, uneven flooring, cluttered walkways, and poorly lit areas. Workers may slip on spills, trip over cords or objects, or fall from elevated surfaces. Proper housekeeping, regular maintenance, and adequate lighting can help reduce the risk of these accidents.
  2. Forklift accidents: Forklifts are essential equipment in warehouses, but they can also be a source of accidents if not operated safely. Accidents can include collisions with pedestrians or other vehicles, tip-overs due to improper loading, or falls from forklifts during lifting operations. Proper training, adherence to safety guidelines, and regular maintenance of forklifts can help minimize the risk of accidents.
  3. Falling objects: In a warehouse or light industrial environment, items stored on shelves, pallet racks, or mezzanines may fall and cause injury to workers. This can occur due to improper stacking, overloading, or structural failures. To prevent these accidents, ensure that storage systems are designed to handle the weight and size of stored items, and train workers in safe material handling practices.
  4. Manual handling and lifting injuries: Workers in warehouses and light industrial environments often need to lift, carry, or move heavy items, which can lead to musculoskeletal injuries such as strains, sprains, or herniated discs. These injuries can result from improper lifting techniques, overexertion, or repetitive motions. Providing training on safe lifting techniques, using mechanical aids, and promoting ergonomics can help reduce the risk of manual handling injuries.
  5. Caught-in/between accidents: These accidents occur when workers get caught, crushed, or pinched between equipment, objects, or structures. Examples include getting caught in machinery, crushed between a forklift and a wall, or pinched by moving parts of equipment. To prevent these accidents, workers should be trained to recognize and avoid hazards, machinery should be properly guarded, and safety procedures should be followed when working around moving equipment or vehicles.

The top 5 types of accidents in an OFFICE/CLERICAL environment:

  1. Slips, trips, and falls: Similar to warehouse environments, office spaces also experience slips, trips, and falls. These accidents can occur due to wet floors, cluttered walkways, loose carpeting, or tangled cords. To prevent these incidents, maintain a clean and organized workspace, ensure proper lighting, and address potential hazards promptly.
  2. Ergonomic injuries: Office workers often spend long hours sitting at their desks and using computers, which can lead to musculoskeletal disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, and lower back pain. To minimize these injuries, provide adjustable chairs and workstations, encourage regular breaks and stretching exercises, and promote proper posture.
  3. Struck-by or falling object accidents: In an office setting, workers can be injured by objects falling from shelves or cabinets, or by accidentally bumping into furniture or equipment. To reduce the risk of these accidents, secure objects on shelves, use caution when opening overhead cabinets, and maintain clear pathways free of obstacles.
  4. Overexertion and manual handling injuries: Office workers may experience overexertion and manual handling injuries when lifting heavy objects like boxes of files, office supplies, or equipment. To prevent these injuries, train employees on proper lifting techniques, use carts or other equipment for transporting heavy items, and store heavier objects at waist level to minimize bending and reaching.
  5. Electrical and fire hazards: Electrical accidents can occur in office environments due to overloaded outlets, damaged cords, or improper use of electrical equipment. Fire hazards can result from faulty wiring, overloaded circuits, or the improper storage of flammable materials. To mitigate these risks, ensure electrical systems and equipment are well-maintained and inspected regularly, practice good housekeeping, and establish and enforce safety protocols for handling electrical devices and flammable materials.

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Disclaimer: The information presented in this article is intended for informational purposes only. RiskProducts.com is not a law firm, and no attorneys were employed or consulted in the compilation of the information contained herein. It is highly recommended that users consult with an attorney or Certified Safety Professional (CSP) before making any policy decisions based, in part or in whole, on the information contained in this article. All safety training and programs must be conducted in compliance with applicable state and federal laws. Ensuring compliance is the sole responsibility of the user of this information and the entity they represent.

Benefits of Saliva Drug Testing for Staffing

Saliva drug testing works by collecting and testing an individual’s saliva, and involves the use of a swab to collect the specimen from the donor’s mouth. Saliva is collected by actively swabbing the cheek, gums, and under the tongue for approximately 3 minutes. The swab is then plunged, screwed, or dropped into a container which activates the testing strips, and rapid results are typically available to read within 10 minutes and up to 1 hour after conducting the test.

Our most popular instant saliva drug test is a lateral flow chromatographic immunoassay for the qualitative detection of drugs and their metabolites in oral fluids at the following cut-off concentrations: Amphetamine (50 ng/mL), Methamphetamine (50 ng/mL), Cocaine (20 ng/mL), Opiates (40 ng/mL), Marijuana (12/75 ng/mL), Phencyclidine (10 ng/mL), Benzodiazepines (50 ng/mL), Oxycodone (50 ng/mL), Methadone (75 ng/mL), Barbiturates (300 ng/mL).

As with any type of rapid diagnostic test, there are both advantages and disadvantages, and the following article is intended to focus solely on the benefits of saliva drug testing. For all types of diagnostic tests, it is recommended that presumptive positive results be confirmed by a certified laboratory in accordance with state and federal laws.

Drug Testing & Staffing Industry
Regardless of the method used (saliva/urine/blood/hair), the simple fact that your company does any type of drug testing (and advertises as such) in and of itself acts as a powerful deterrent for predatory applicants, and has proven benefits in reducing on-the-job accidents/injuries, healthcare expenses, and various workers comp-related costs.

A study from 2015 reports that only less than half (approximately 45%) of staffing companies use drug testing across the board to screen their applicants, and 26% of all staffing firms say they rarely test or do not test their applicants at all. In addition, recent preliminary surveys show the number of companies who do not test (or have discontinued testing during/post pandemic) has significantly increased since 2020. Thus, staffing companies that continue testing most or all of their applicants should consider their practices to be best in class.

Administration
There are several ways in which a saliva drug test is easier to take when compared to alternative urine tests, blood draws, or hair follicle collections. Blood draws and hair follicle collections are more invasive and can cause unnecessary pain – even a skilled healthcare worker may have trouble finding a vein to draw blood, and hair follicle collection can be costly, intrusive, and time-consuming. Urine testing presents its own challenges, as donors may have trouble producing a urine sample on demand (even after drinking excess water), and those with paruresis (shy bladder syndrome) may have an even more difficult time. In addition, both blood and urine can be classified as hazardous fluids and require special handling.

On the other hand, saliva testing can be conducted at any time, without the risk of physical pain and added anxiety. A saliva drug test does not require a restroom or dedicated facility, and the entire procedure can be administered in the presence of both the administrator and donor. With urine tests, the specimen is collected by the donor themselves in privacy, significantly increasing the risk of adulteration/dilution of the urine specimen.

Adulteration & Dilution
There are four common methods a donor will typically use to cheat/beat a urine drug test: 1) substituting their urine with synthetic urine or clean/drug-free urine purchased from an outside source; 2) drinking a commercial product to help flush out specific drugs from the system; 3) adding an adulterant chemical/substance in vitro to the specimen after collection to mask the drugs; 4) using tap/toilet water to dilute or substitute the specimen. These products/methods are readily available on the internet and can be easily obtained. While some instant urine tests do include additional strips/tests for adulteration which may catch in vitro additives, it is worth noting that synthetic urine and dilution tactics have been proven to successfully cheat/outsmart urine adulteration strips.

As highlighted in the previous section, saliva drug testing can be performed in the presence of the administrator, so there is little to no risk of adulteration or substitution. While there are countless products on the market for adulterating and cheating a urine drug test, there are no known saliva adulterants for beating a saliva test. In addition, donors are encouraged to wait 10-15 minutes before providing a sample to help reduce the risk of anything in the mouth affecting the test.

Minimum Detection / Impairment
The minimum detection window/period is the amount of time it takes for a drug to show up in a person’s system after using the drug. A urine test detects the major metabolite of a drug, while a saliva test will detect the parent compound of the drug (the same compound found in blood). Saliva testing has a better minimum detection window since it takes about 4 hours for a drug to become detectable in urine – while drugs can be detected almost immediately in saliva (as soon as the individual begins to feel the effects of the drug). For example, the Journal of Analytical Toxicology states, “…urine testing may be unable to identify that someone has smoked cannabis in the previous four hours—precisely the time frame which is most relevant for identifying likely impairment.”

Cost
Saliva drug testing has been on the market and widely accepted for over a decade now. The cost of saliva devices has dropped significantly in recent years due to increased supply and options. Compared to a standard laboratory urine/blood test or hair follicle test, saliva testing is much more cost-effective. Urine testing can be slightly cheaper than saliva testing, but mouth swabs are becoming more comparable in price as one of the most efficient ways to test on the market.

Conclusion
Here is a bulleted overview of the comprehensive benefits of saliva drug testing:

  • Non-invasive and comfortable: Saliva drug testing is less intrusive compared to blood, urine, or hair tests, providing a more comfortable experience for donors. This can lead to greater cooperation and acceptance among employees, potentially improving the overall screening process.
  • Fast results: Saliva drug tests can produce results quickly, often within minutes. This allows for timely decision-making and can help reduce downtime for both employees and employers during the screening process.
  • Applicable to a wide range of substances: Saliva drug tests can detect a broad range of substances, including prescription medications, illegal drugs, and even some over-the-counter medications. This versatility makes saliva drug testing a valuable tool for staffing agencies and employers looking to maintain a drug-free workplace.
  • Storage and transportation: Saliva samples are relatively easy to store and transport, as they do not require refrigeration or special handling. This can simplify the logistics of sample collection and transportation to a certified laboratory for confirmation testing, if necessary.
  • Legal compliance: Saliva drug testing can be a useful tool for employers to comply with various federal and state regulations, such as the Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations and other industry-specific requirements.
  • Improved workplace safety and productivity: Implementing saliva drug testing as part of a comprehensive drug-free workplace program can contribute to a safer and more productive work environment. Reduced drug-related accidents and absenteeism can lead to improved employee morale, lower insurance premiums, and increased overall efficiency.

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Disclaimer: The information presented in this article is intended for informational purposes only. RiskProducts.com is not a law firm, and no attorneys were employed or consulted in the compilation of the information contained herein. It is highly recommended that users consult with an attorney or a drug testing expert before making any policy decisions based, in part or in whole, on the information contained in this article. All forms of diagnostic and employment testing must be conducted in compliance with applicable state and federal laws. Ensuring compliance is the sole responsibility of the user of this information and the entity they represent.

Top 5: Deadliest Drugs

The top five deadliest drugs in the United States, including both illegal and prescription drugs, are as follows:

  1. Fentanyl: Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine. It is responsible for a significant number of overdose deaths, as it is often mixed with other drugs such as heroin, cocaine, or counterfeit prescription pills, leading to unintentional ingestion and overdose.
  2. Heroin: Heroin is an illegal and highly addictive opioid drug derived from morphine. It has been a significant contributor to the opioid crisis in the United States and is responsible for a large number of overdose deaths.
  3. Methamphetamine: Methamphetamine, commonly known as meth, is a powerful and highly addictive stimulant. It can lead to numerous health issues, including heart attack, stroke, and long-term damage to the brain and body. Overdoses related to methamphetamine have been steadily increasing.
  4. Cocaine: Cocaine is an illegal stimulant drug that has been linked to a significant number of overdose deaths. Its use can lead to various health issues, such as heart attacks, seizures, and respiratory failure.
  5. Prescription opioids: This category includes drugs such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine. While these medications are prescribed for legitimate medical reasons, they have a high potential for abuse and addiction. Prescription opioid misuse and overdose have been major contributors to the opioid crisis in the United States.

It’s important to note that the specific rankings of these drugs may vary depending on the data source and time frame. However, these substances consistently rank among the deadliest drugs in the United States.

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Disclaimer: The information presented in this article is intended for informational purposes only. RiskProducts.com is not a law firm, and no attorneys were employed or consulted in the compilation of the information contained herein. It is highly recommended that users consult with an attorney or a drug testing expert before making any policy decisions based, in part or in whole, on the information contained in this article. All forms of diagnostic and employment testing must be conducted in compliance with applicable state and federal laws. Ensuring compliance is the sole responsibility of the user of this information and the entity they represent.

Safety Tips: Working Around Forklifts

Safety Tips for Working Around Forklifts

  1. Be aware of forklift traffic: Stay vigilant and be aware of forklifts operating in the area. Keep an eye out for visual and audible signals, such as flashing lights or horns.
  2. Maintain a safe distance: Keep a safe distance from forklifts, as they can make sudden stops or turns. Avoid walking too closely behind or alongside them.
  3. Use designated walkways: Whenever possible, use designated pedestrian walkways and avoid walking through forklift traffic lanes.
  4. Make eye contact: Make eye contact with forklift operators to ensure they see you before crossing their path. Use clear hand signals to communicate your intentions.
  5. Avoid distractions: Refrain from using headphones, phones, or any other distractions while working around forklifts. It’s essential to remain alert and focused on your surroundings.
  6. Wear high-visibility clothing: Wear bright, high-visibility clothing and/or reflective vests to make it easier for forklift operators to see you.
  7. Follow warehouse safety guidelines: Adhere to established warehouse safety guidelines and procedures, including the proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE).
  8. Be cautious near blind spots: Be extra cautious near blind spots, such as corners, intersections, or narrow aisles, where forklift operators may have limited visibility.
  9. Stay clear of raised loads: Do not walk or stand under raised forklift loads, as they may become unstable and fall.
  10. Report unsafe conditions: If you notice any unsafe conditions, such as debris in walkways or malfunctioning equipment, report them to a supervisor immediately.
  11. Participate in safety training: Attend safety training sessions to stay informed about forklift hazards and best practices for working around them.
  12. Do not engage in horseplay: Avoid engaging in horseplay, running, or other unsafe behaviors around forklifts, as these can lead to accidents.
  13. Be mindful of load stability: Keep an eye on the stability of loads being carried by forklifts and alert the operator if you notice any issues.
  14. Coordinate with forklift operators: Communicate and coordinate with forklift operators, especially during tasks that require working in close proximity to the forklift.

By following these safety tips, workers can minimize the risk of accidents and ensure a safer working environment around forklifts in warehouses.

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Disclaimer: The information presented in this article is intended for informational purposes only. RiskProducts.com is not a law firm, and no attorneys were employed or consulted in the compilation of the information contained herein. It is highly recommended that users consult with an attorney or Certified Safety Professional (CSP) before making any policy decisions based, in part or in whole, on the information contained in this article. All safety training and programs must be conducted in compliance with applicable state and federal laws. Ensuring compliance is the sole responsibility of the user of this information and the entity they represent.

Pre-Employment Drug Testing = Fewer Accidents

Pre-employment drug testing is an essential tool for promoting a safe, productive, and drug-free work environment. By screening job applicants for drug and alcohol use, employers can minimize the risk of workplace accidents, reduce absenteeism, and improve overall productivity. This article discusses the significance of pre-employment drug testing and highlights relevant statistics that demonstrate the correlation between substance abuse and workplace accidents.

The Role of Pre-Employment Drug Testing in Ensuring Workplace Safety
Substance abuse is a pervasive issue that affects millions of people worldwide. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), in 2020, 65.9 million people aged 12 or older in the United States used illicit drugs or misused prescription drugs in the past year. Substance abuse in the workplace not only impacts the individuals involved but also jeopardizes the safety and well-being of their co-workers.

Pre-employment drug testing helps identify individuals who may be at risk of causing accidents or reducing productivity due to substance abuse. By proactively screening job candidates, employers can make more informed hiring decisions and create a safer work environment for all employees.

Statistics on Workplace Accidents Related to Alcohol and Drug Use
Substance abuse in the workplace is a significant contributor to accidents and injuries. A study conducted by the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) found that employees who abuse drugs are 3.5 times more likely to be involved in workplace accidents than those who do not. Furthermore, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) estimates that 10-20% of workplace fatalities involve alcohol.

In addition to the increased risk of accidents, drug and alcohol abuse can also lead to higher rates of absenteeism, reduced productivity, and increased healthcare costs. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), substance abuse in the workplace costs the United States over $740 billion annually in lost productivity, healthcare expenses, and crime-related costs (NIDA, 2020).

Benefits of Pre-Employment Drug Testing
Implementing pre-employment drug testing offers numerous benefits to employers and employees alike:

  1. Improved workplace safety: Identifying individuals who may be at risk of causing accidents due to substance abuse helps to create a safer work environment for all employees.
  2. Reduced absenteeism and turnover: Employees who abuse drugs or alcohol are more likely to be absent from work and have higher turnover rates. Pre-employment drug testing can help employers identify and address these issues early in the hiring process.
  3. Enhanced productivity: Employees who are free from substance abuse are more likely to be focused, engaged, and productive at work.
  4. Compliance with regulations: In some industries, such as transportation and safety-sensitive positions, pre-employment drug testing is required by federal or state regulations. Implementing a drug testing program ensures compliance with these requirements.
  5. Positive company image: A drug-free workplace demonstrates a commitment to safety, health, and responsible business practices, which can enhance the company’s reputation and attract top talent.

Conclusion
Pre-employment drug testing is a critical component of a comprehensive workplace safety program. By identifying potential substance abuse issues before hiring, employers can reduce the risk of accidents, improve productivity, and create a safer, healthier work environment. Considering the significant impact of substance abuse on workplace safety and productivity, investing in pre-employment drug testing is not only a responsible decision but also a sound business practice.

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Disclaimer: The information presented in this article is intended for informational purposes only. RiskProducts.com is not a law firm, and no attorneys were employed or consulted in the compilation of the information contained herein. It is highly recommended that users consult with an attorney or a drug testing expert before making any policy decisions based, in part or in whole, on the information contained in this article. All forms of diagnostic and employment testing must be conducted in compliance with applicable state and federal laws. Ensuring compliance is the sole responsibility of the user of this information and the entity they represent.

Safety Tips: Pinch Points

Pinch Points and Caught-in-Between Accident Tips

  1. Understand the hazards: Be aware of the machinery and equipment in your workplace that may pose risks due to pinch points or caught-in-between accidents. Familiarize yourself with their functions and potential dangers.
  2. Receive proper training: Ensure that you receive comprehensive training on how to operate machinery safely, and understand the specific risks associated with each piece of equipment.
  3. Inspect equipment regularly: Before using any machinery, perform a visual inspection to ensure that all guards and safety devices are in place and functioning correctly. Report any damaged or missing guards to your supervisor immediately.
  4. Keep a safe distance: Maintain a safe distance from machinery with moving parts or pinch points. Be aware of your surroundings and the proximity of other workers to the equipment.
  5. Use proper lockout/tagout procedures: When performing maintenance or repairs on machinery, always follow the appropriate lockout/tagout procedures to prevent accidental startup and potential injuries.
  6. Never bypass safety guards: Never remove or tamper with machine guards or safety devices, as they are in place to protect you from potential hazards.
  7. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE): Ensure that you are wearing the required PPE, such as gloves, safety glasses, and protective clothing, to minimize the risk of injury.
  8. Keep work areas clean and organized: A cluttered workspace can lead to accidents. Keep your work area free of debris and maintain clear access to machinery and emergency exits.
  9. Avoid loose clothing and jewelry: Loose clothing, jewelry, or long hair can become entangled in machinery, causing severe injuries. Secure or remove these items before working with machinery.
  10. Communicate with coworkers: Maintain clear communication with your coworkers, especially when working in close proximity to machinery. Use hand signals or other means of communication to alert others of your intentions and ensure everyone’s safety.
  11. Report incidents and near misses: If you experience or witness a near miss or accident involving pinch points or caught-in-between hazards, report the incident to your supervisor immediately. This will help identify potential risks and prevent future accidents.

By following these safety tips and maintaining a proactive approach to workplace safety, you can minimize the risk of injuries related to pinch points and caught-in-between accidents.

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Disclaimer: The information presented in this article is intended for informational purposes only. RiskProducts.com is not a law firm, and no attorneys were employed or consulted in the compilation of the information contained herein. It is highly recommended that users consult with an attorney or Certified Safety Professional (CSP) before making any policy decisions based, in part or in whole, on the information contained in this article. All safety training and programs must be conducted in compliance with applicable state and federal laws. Ensuring compliance is the sole responsibility of the user of this information and the entity they represent.

‘Will CBD Oils Cause a Positive Drug Test Result?’

Understanding the Differences between CBD and THC
CBD, or cannabidiol, is one of many chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant, which comprises two main species – hemp and marijuana. Both hemp and marijuana contain CBD, as well as THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). THC is responsible for the psychoactive ‘high’ feeling and is only present in trace amounts in hemp. CBD should be derived exclusively from the hemp plant, which also contains a much higher percentage of CBD than marijuana. The World Health Organization reports that “CBD exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential. … To date, there is no evidence of public health-related problems associated with the use of pure CBD.”

The Legality of CBD
Cannabidiol is currently legal at the federal level in the United States, provided it is derived from hemp and contains less than 0.3% THC. While CBD hemp oil is technically legal on the federal level nationwide, laws vary by state, and individual states still have the authority to ban CBD. At the time of this article, Idaho, South Dakota, and Nebraska had more stringent regulations on CBD than other states. We recommend checking local laws to ensure compliance. It is also worth noting that CBD can be easily purchased online and delivered to one’s home, regardless of state regulations.

Will CBD Oil Cause a Positive Drug Test?
Whether or not CBD oils cause a positive drug test for THC depends on the purity of the CBD oil. Pure CBD oil will not yield a positive result for a THC drug test. As mentioned earlier, CBD products must be produced from hemp plants with no more than 0.3% THC. If there is a higher percentage of THC contamination (enough to trigger a presumptive positive drug test result), the oils would actually be illegal according to the FDA.

The issue becomes complicated when considering reputable versus non-reputable brands of CBD oils. While the industry is improving its regulation of production, it’s possible for non-reputable CBD brands to have higher levels of THC contamination than legally allowed. If a candidate tests positive for THC and claims to have only used CBD, you may want to recommend they switch to a more reputable brand. A reputable brand should have clear labeling and use high-quality hemp, while also taking part in third-party lab tests to ensure the product contains the advertised amount of CBD and is within the legal THC limit.

Types of Drug Tests and CBD
There are various types of drug tests, including urine, saliva, blood, and hair tests. Most drug tests screen for THC, not CBD. However, some tests may be sensitive enough to detect trace amounts of THC in CBD oil. It’s also important to note that a laboratory confirmation test can help quantify and differentiate the levels of CBD and THC in the specimen. However, if the CBD oil was heavily contaminated, interpreting the lab results could still be challenging, as it may be difficult to determine whether the THC was purposefully ingested or inadvertently consumed due to contamination from a non-reputable brand.

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Disclaimer: The information presented in this article is intended for informational purposes only. RiskProducts.com is not a law firm, and no attorneys were employed or consulted in the compilation of the information contained herein. It is highly recommended that users consult with an attorney or a drug testing expert before making any policy decisions based, in part or in whole, on the information contained in this article. All forms of diagnostic and employment testing must be conducted in compliance with applicable state and federal laws. Ensuring compliance is the sole responsibility of the user of this information and the entity they represent.

OSHA’s New Rule on Post-Accident Drug Testing

Recently, OSHA amended their rules for post-accident drug testing, leaving many employers wondering, “What does this mean for me, and how do I stay compliant?” To better serve our customers, we have highlighted some essential information concerning the new rule and added best practices for implementation:

Overview of the New Rule
OSHA no longer permits mandatory or blanket post-accident drug testing. This change stems from the belief that blanket testing may act as a deterrent for legitimately injured employees to report on-the-job accidents due to fear of being drug tested.

Can Employers Still Conduct Post-Accident Drug Testing?
Yes, under section 1904.35(b)(1)(iv), OSHA does not prohibit employers from drug testing employees who report work-related injuries or illnesses, provided there is an “objectively reasonable basis” for testing.

Defining “Reasonable Basis”
OSHA maintains that drug testing policies should “limit post-incident testing to situations in which employee drug use is likely to have contributed to the incident, and for which the drug test can accurately identify impairment caused by drug use.” While this is still open to interpretation, a helpful guideline might be to ask yourself, “Is it likely that drug use could have directly contributed to the accident?” If the answer is “Yes,” then you may proceed with testing.

Staying Compliant with the New Rule
To ensure compliance with the new rule, update your company’s substance abuse policy to reflect the change and revise any post-accident drug testing language in your employment consent forms. For example:

“I understand that (Insert Your Company Name) may require drug testing when an on-the-job accident or injury is reported, and drug use is likely to have contributed to the incident. My refusal to submit to drug testing will be grounds for termination.”

Best Practices for Implementation

  • Train your management and HR personnel on the new rule, ensuring they understand the criteria for determining when a post-accident drug test is appropriate.
  • Regularly review and update your substance abuse policy to ensure compliance with evolving regulations and industry standards.
  • Ensure clear communication with employees about the updated policy and provide resources to educate them on their rights and responsibilities.
  • Establish a protocol for documenting the decision-making process when determining whether to administer a post-accident drug test, including a description of the circumstances and rationale for testing.

By understanding and adhering to OSHA’s new rule on post-accident drug testing, employers can maintain a safe work environment while respecting employees’ rights and privacy. Implementing best practices will further strengthen your company’s commitment to employee well-being and regulatory compliance.

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Disclaimer: The information presented in this article is intended for informational purposes only. RiskProducts.com is not a law firm, and no attorneys were employed or consulted in the compilation of the information contained herein. It is highly recommended that users consult with an attorney or a drug testing expert before making any policy decisions based, in part or in whole, on the information contained in this article. All forms of diagnostic and employment testing must be conducted in compliance with applicable state and federal laws. Ensuring compliance is the sole responsibility of the user of this information and the entity they represent.